By Morgan Lundquist

In 2014, a 60 second commercial was debuted during the Super Bowl presented by the feminine care products, Always brand. It touched many people and started a very big revolution with the hashtag, #likeagirl, and it immediately started trending on twitter. This campaign was launched to help women and girls everyway to keep their confidence even after puberty hits, be proud of who you are.

Always did a fantastic job choosing a variety of women from many different races, ethnicity’s and ages to be able to portray each type of woman there is. This commercial also showed that this stereo type is something we have learned from just growing up, rather than something you are born with.

The campaign begun when a woman named Lauren Greenfield found a statistic that “72% of girls feel that society limits them, especially during puberty” (Always). This made Greenfield curious on what everyday women, men, girls and boys thought about what the phrase ‘Like a Girl’ means. The overwhelming, not prepared responses helped build the campaign into what it is because of how heartfelt and raw each answer was. Ultimately the campaign got many people talking and realizing how something so little, could become so large on social media and start a movement.

Women are still tweeting a year later, about how confident and how happy they are to run, throw, play sports and just wake up ‘Like a Girl’. I strongly believe this campaign was a social win because even so long after the campaign debuted, people are still talking about it. Time magazine did an article comparing this campaign to things such as Doves’ Real Beauty campaign, empowering woman to see herself as beautiful and have confidence in who they are.

Contributing to considering this campaign a social win, in an Ad Week article, Always is now partnering with TED talks to spread confidence and think of ways to come up with an educational platform on how to impact men and women everywhere to stay confident in who they are. One thing I would to do improve the campaign is promote more what boys think “Like a Girl” means to them. In the campaign, there are only two men involved and by showing more of a boys prospective it would help resonate with a much broader audience.

Like Huffington Post states, airing a commercial about feminine products during the Super Bowl was a very gusty and groundbreaking event. With such a male dominated event being aired, its extremely cool to be able to say that so many people were impacted by a company that sells feminine products and markets normally towards women. Ultimately, I believe this campaign did so well because it was so unique and can resonate with many people. It’s very special to be able to say something like this was ever created because self-confidence and being proud of whom you are is something many women and girls struggle with on a daily basis after going through puberty. All in all, this campaign definitely touched my heart when I first saw it and I can’t wait to see how it continues to grow and where it goes.

References:

OUR EPIC BATTLE #LIKEAGIRL. (2016). Retrieved February 8, 2016, from http://always.com/en-us/about-us/our-epic-battle-like-a-girl

Beltrone, G. (2015, July 8). Ad of the Day: Girls Are Unstoppable in Next Phase of Always ‘Like a Girl’ Campaign. Retrieved February 8, 2016, from http://www.adweek.com/news/advertising-branding/ad-day-girls-are-unstoppable-next-phase-always-girl-campaign-165784

Goldberg, H. (2014, June 26). This Ad Completely Redefines the Phrase “Like a Girl”. Retrieved February 8, 2016, from http://time.com/2927761/likeagirl-always-female-empowerment/

Berman, J. (2015, February 2). Why That ‘Like A Girl’ Super Bowl Ad Was So Groundbreaking. Retrieved February 8, 2016, from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/02/02/always-super-bowl-ad_n_6598328.html

Kahn, M. (2014, July 1). Always Redefines What It Means to Run ‘Like a Girl’ Retrieved February 8, 2016, from http://abcnews.go.com/Lifestyle/redefines-means-run-girl/story?id=24377039