By: Scott Moore

During the 2015 Allstate Sugar bowl on January 1st, Allstate successfully launched a #SocialWin campaign that lasted for the entirety of the game. Although the campaign only lasted the duration of the game, the buzz that soon surrounded around the campaign is what makes it appealing and successful. What made this campaign so intriguing to me is that it presented a serious (and needed) topic of discussion in internet safety mixed with humorous commercials that encouraged further online activity.

Project Share Aware was created and along with this was #MayhemSale. Their purpose – targeting mainly millennials – was to broadcast the dangers of sharing your location online via social media while you are away from home as it could result in targeting by social-savvy burglars (Mobile Marketer). This was a perfect situation in which to do so since the example used to introduce the campaign was through a commercial that exposed a couple who posted a picture of themselves away from home, at the Sugar Bowl.

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Allstate continued with more than half a dozen commercials  that transmitted Dean Winters as the burglar inside their home who put items on “sale.” A website (Allstate) was even created for viewers to fake bid on items and follow the campaign during the game. That site now assists users who visit with tips on managing and cleaning up their social media settings along with updating privacy settings to further protect them and their location from mayhem (Mashable).

Along with the commercials in between the game, as seen above, Allstate also took to Twitter as well as Facebook to promote the cause and included the hashtag on every platform. They used these platforms to periodically announce different items that would be going on sale.

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The #MayhemSale hashtag was also placed in the corner of the commercial for consumers to look up and follow along. Allstate was not only to create buzz around the dangers of oversharing on social media, but they took it further by being “social-savvy” themselves and providing humor behind it.

However, Allstate wasn’t done there. They followed by staying true to their campaign, reporting that replicas of the items that were being featured throughout various platforms were actually being sold and purchased by real people online. Allstate reported to ABC News that 300 items for sale would be delivered to the buyers in the next two weeks.

I consider this to be a very successful campaign and a total #SocialWin. Allstate created awareness around the dangers of being online and posting your location nowadays. To me, it was a genius move by Allstate to relate and present the vulnerabilities of oversharing online to their home insurance capabilities. Marketing Land described the campaign as a “brilliant marriage between big reach TV sports broadcast and interactively engaging social media.” The numbers back up the successful campaigns as well. 18 million website hits during the game even caused the site to crash.

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On both Twitter and Facebook, the campaign further proved to be a #SocialWin. Gaining 24,000 followers on Twitter with over 40 million impressions (The Wall Street Journal) and over 20 million impressions in less than a day on Facebook. The #Mayhem hashtag was also a global trend on Twitter for the duration of the game.

It’s hard to come up with ways to improve such a successful campaign. Besides utilizing even more platforms to gain more exposure, I would improve this campaign by following through. Although 300 items were reportedly sold, it was discovered that many received cancellation emails to their orders in as little as 48 hours after receiving confirmation emails as shown in the Reddit post below.

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Allstate capped off the successful #SocialWin campaign on a serious note to ensure that even though it was humorous, the dangers of oversharing information on social media is very real.

 

SOURCES:

Bohannon, Caitlyn (2015, January 5). Allstate’s Aware Share campaign encourages safe social sharing. Retrieved February 8,2016 from http://www.mobilemarketer.com/cms/news/social-networks/19476.html

Hall, Steve (2015, January 5). Allstate’s Mayhem Sold The Entire Contents Of This Couple’s House While They Were At The Sugar Bowl. Retrieved February 8,2016 from http://marketingland.com/allstates-mayhem-sold-entire-contents-couples-house-sugar-bowl-113023

Kim, Susanne (2015, January 2). Allstate’s ‘Mayhem’ is Biggest Winner of College Bowl. ABC. Retrieved February 8, 2016 from http://abcnews.go.com/Business/allstates-mayhem-biggest-winner-college-bowl/story?id=27960362

Tadena, Nathalie (2015, January 2). Allstate’s Sugar Bowl Ad Push Generates Online Buzz. The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved February 8,2016 from http://blogs.wsj.com/cmo/2015/01/02/allstates-sugar-bowl-ad-push-generates-online-buzz/

Wasserman, Todd (2015, January 2). Allstate’s Mayhem guy sold your stolen stuff on New Year’s Day. Mashable. Retrieved February 8,2016 from http://mashable.com/2015/01/02/allstate-mayhemsale/#1sK3oX8U3Eqh