Ohio University Strategic Social Media

Crowdsourced Learning Lab #ouj4530

Category: Anna Rudin

Sink of SeaWorld #SocialFail

By Anna Rudin

As we know, SeaWorld is one of the most popular attractions in Orlando Florida, ranking the 10th most visited amusement park in the United States and nineteenth worldwide. The Shamu Stadium being one of the most admired live entertainments holding a seven million gallon home for the parks 7 killer whales. There has been much controversy over the issue of having such large species in a confined body of water; this has pushed some over the edge leading to a plethora of lawsuits and SeaWorld new marketing push, the “Ask SeaWorld” campaign.

March 27th , 2015 “Ask SeaWorld” marketing campaign includes TV and print ads also inviting the public to submit questions via twitter about how the company treats their animals. This backfired making it a top social fail on social media. This campaign created the trending hash tag on twitter #AskSeaWorld followed by @SeaWorld. Creators of this campaign thought it would encourage those who are interested in their parks or the mammals in general to ask about topics ranging from breeding to safety and training questions, little would they know, this would spiral in a negative direction. The twitter timeline got slammed with harsh comments from activists and animal lovers that were unhappy with the company and the living situations of their marine life.

The company has been under, struggling to convince the public that their orcas are not mistreated since the death of trainer Dawn Brancheau in 2010 and the Black Fish documentary in 2013, the Askseaworld.com campaign was supposed to help them by marketing well thought out questions about killer whale care to keep customers happy. The #AskSeaWorld was hijacked by animal right campaigners trending the #Emptythetanks, #blackfish along with quotes “are your tanks filled with orca tears?” many found that the campaign was not working and that the company had many misleading statements about the whales which caused even more uproar.

After years of negative publicity SeaWorld took the chance creating the new campaign to try to “counter misinformation”. The hash tag #AskSeaWorld was to promise answers from experts but opponents of SeaWorld were much more organized with their negative responses beating out the positive responses by a landslide. A rising question discussed that held debate was talking about how the company should stop being fixated on the AskSeaWorld campaign spending millions of dollars creating a website trying to find a solution for its image for the better, but instead should be spending more money on rehabbing the orcas making the environment as “natural as possible”. If I were to help this campaign on having a more positive outreach to the public I would agree with the statement above, I think spreading awareness on social media can in fact make or break a company, if SeaWorld wants people to look at them differently they should invest in making the living environments for orcas more sustainable and suitable for the large mammals.

This debate of having orcas in such a small living area has been an discussed over social media for years now.  Visit http://ask.seaworldcares.com/ and ask your own questions or check #AskSeaWorld on twitter to see how this social fail spiraled out of control.

Sources:

Katie, L. (2015, March 27) ‘Ask seaworld’ marketing campaign backfires http://money.cnn.com/2015/03/27/news/companies/ask-seaworld-twitter/

Sabrina, W. (2015, March 29) SeaWorld #AskSeaWorld Twitter Campaign Backfires Massively

http://www.refinery29.com/2015/03/84660/ask-seaworld-twitter-fail-killer-whales

Becky, P. (2015, March 31) “Are your tanks filled with orca tears?”

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-3019299/Are-tanks-filled-orca-tears-SeaWorld-Twitter-campaign-backfires-water-park-hashtag-AskSeaWorld-hijacked-animal-rights-campaigners.html

2015 SeaWorld Parks and Entertainment

http://ask.seaworldcares.com/

Twitter.com use #AskSeaWorld or @SeaWorld

https://twitter.com/SeaWorld

 

 

 

 

Lets always be “LikeAGirl” #socialwin

By Anna Rudin

#LikeAGirl hit home on YouTube in June 2014, with more than 80 million views worldwide and is still heavily communicated today. “Like a girl” campaign is sponsored through Always brand starting the movement of empowerment in young women. This specific campaign had positive feedback starting the trending hash tag #LikeAGirl on Twitter allowing several individuals to be involved and share their inspiring stories or pictures through the twitter world. It even made appearance on @espnW correlating to the #NGWSD (Happy Nation Girls and Women In Sports Day). This campaign will also return as a 2016 Super Bowl ad, most would think of it as a social media win.

#LikeAgirl campaign was created to educate young girls all over the world that it is okay to throw, catch, run etc. “like a girl” the term itself plummets confidence in the young age of women especially when they hit puberty. Always took this message and wanted to have the term take a positive wide-reach affect on girls crafting a boost in their confidence.

A few questions and concerns that struck this campaign was the questions of when did something “like a girl” become an insult, how does it affect the confidence of young girls, and what advice are they trying to push on the younger generation so they do not go through this disempowering movement of hating the term, “Like a girl”. After looking over the campaign we ask ourselves, do we limit girls? In fact, 72% of girls DO feel that society has limitations for them according to Always.com.

During the casting for always commercial they asked a group of teen girls and a few young boys what it looks like to run “like a girl”, in response to this question the casting crew added pep to their step, flailing their hands out some even saying “oh my gosh my hair” this shows that society has put a label on what “like a girl” means and making it humiliating to be “like a girl”. When they asked younger girls the same question, they ran with power, their conception of running “like a girl” was completely different, it shows that teens go through a rough patch decreasing their confidence greatly and always wants to change that.

If we educate those at a young age creating the perception that being “like a girl” is the opposite of un-empowering and that it is important to be a strong, confident individual being just as good as any other person we will not have the negative impact on society that being “like a girl” is a bad thing. The campaign overall has had a positive reach to those who are struggling with these issues, it has been all over the web with eye catching posts to help spread the awareness. #LikeAGirl is going to make being “like a girl” mean amazing things, join them to champion girls confidence at always.com.

References:

David G. Hugely Popular ‘Like a Girl’ Campaign From Always Will Return as a Super Bowl Ad (2015, Jan 29)

http://www.adweek.com/news/advertising-branding/hugely-popular-girl-campaign-always-will-return-sunday-super-bowl-ad-162619

#LikeAGirl campaign

http://always.com/en-us/about-us/our-epic-battle-like-a-girl

unstoppable #LikeAGirl video (2014, June 26th)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XjJQBjWYDTs

search #LikeAGirl on twitter

https://twitter.com/search?q=%23likeagirl&src=typd

Alanna V. The Reaction To #LikeAGirl Is Exactly Why It’s So Important (2015, Feb 4)

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/02/03/why-like-a-girl-is-so-important_n_6598970.html